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On Sunday, a number of news outlets ran stories covering the rise of easily-accessible pornography on the new video sharing app Vine , causing a firestorm of debate online. The New York Times' Nick Bilton tweeted that pornographic material was discoverable thanks to simple hashtags such as #porn.

But the truth is that Vine doesn't have a problem with porn, at least not one that isn't shared by any other social media app. Apple has a problem: its App Store's puritanical, unevenly-enforced policies for adult content. Vine is just today's example.

The Twitter-owned app and service launched last week to much fanfare, mostly due to its ingenious editing functions, which allow users to stop and start a video recording. Vine is also notable as one of Twitter's first major departures from its core social networking business. The iOS-only app was prominently featured by Apple as an "Editor's Pick" in its App Store the day it launched.

The news that pornography or nudity would find its way into a popular social app, which is focused on image or video sharing, takes a backseat to the larger question of how Apple will handle this flare-up. Recently the company pulled a popular photo sharing application from its App Store called 500px citing the discovery of "pornographic images and material." Apple offered this statement:

The app was removed from the App Store for featuring pornographic images and material, a clear violation of our guidelines. We also received customer complaints about possible child pornography. We've asked the developer to put safeguards in place to prevent pornographic images and material in their app.

On Sunday, a number of news outlets ran stories covering the rise of easily-accessible pornography on the new video sharing app Vine , causing a firestorm of debate online. The New York Times' Nick Bilton tweeted that pornographic material was discoverable thanks to simple hashtags such as #porn.

But the truth is that Vine doesn't have a problem with porn, at least not one that isn't shared by any other social media app. Apple has a problem: its App Store's puritanical, unevenly-enforced policies for adult content. Vine is just today's example.

The Twitter-owned app and service launched last week to much fanfare, mostly due to its ingenious editing functions, which allow users to stop and start a video recording. Vine is also notable as one of Twitter's first major departures from its core social networking business. The iOS-only app was prominently featured by Apple as an "Editor's Pick" in its App Store the day it launched.

The news that pornography or nudity would find its way into a popular social app, which is focused on image or video sharing, takes a backseat to the larger question of how Apple will handle this flare-up. Recently the company pulled a popular photo sharing application from its App Store called 500px citing the discovery of "pornographic images and material." Apple offered this statement:

The app was removed from the App Store for featuring pornographic images and material, a clear violation of our guidelines. We also received customer complaints about possible child pornography. We've asked the developer to put safeguards in place to prevent pornographic images and material in their app.

MacRumors attracts a broad audience of both consumers and professionals interested in the latest technologies and products. We also boast an active community focused on purchasing decisions and technical aspects of the iPhone, iPod, iPad, and Mac platforms.

VIEW ALL PHOTOS IN GALLERY Style and aesthetic taste change over time; what was hot in the '80s or '90s, or cool in the '50s or '60s, can look downright laughable today (as does everything from the '70s). But when it comes to technology, there was no aesthetic taste or style until less than a decade ago. Tech hardware looked like it was designed by the left-brained engineers that developed it. PCs were beige, software user interfaces were boxy and ugly, and no one complained because we simply didn't know they could be anything else.

In 1998, a struggling Apple Computer, Inc. released the iMac G3, an all-in-one desktop PC that was roughly the size of the CRT monitors we were all using back then. And instead of beige, the iMac was translucent "Bondi-blue" plastic. Computers could be translucent? In colors named after beaches?! The geeks were stunned.

Apple's been sexing up technology and fusing the design and tech worlds together ever since, with attractive and innovative hardware like the iPod, iMac G4, Power Mac Cube, iPod nano, and the iPhone. And don't forget what the company's done for the comeliness of software with OS X and iTunes. For our steamy Apple Porn slideshow, we've unearthed 25 explicit pictures from the PCMag.com archives of the drool-worthiest tech Apple has offered since the turn of the century. Click through to gawk, salivate, and reminisce.

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A new website called LocalCooling.com claims to "fight global warming from your desktop" by optimiz... More »

On Sunday, a number of news outlets ran stories covering the rise of easily-accessible pornography on the new video sharing app Vine , causing a firestorm of debate online. The New York Times' Nick Bilton tweeted that pornographic material was discoverable thanks to simple hashtags such as #porn.

But the truth is that Vine doesn't have a problem with porn, at least not one that isn't shared by any other social media app. Apple has a problem: its App Store's puritanical, unevenly-enforced policies for adult content. Vine is just today's example.

The Twitter-owned app and service launched last week to much fanfare, mostly due to its ingenious editing functions, which allow users to stop and start a video recording. Vine is also notable as one of Twitter's first major departures from its core social networking business. The iOS-only app was prominently featured by Apple as an "Editor's Pick" in its App Store the day it launched.

The news that pornography or nudity would find its way into a popular social app, which is focused on image or video sharing, takes a backseat to the larger question of how Apple will handle this flare-up. Recently the company pulled a popular photo sharing application from its App Store called 500px citing the discovery of "pornographic images and material." Apple offered this statement:

The app was removed from the App Store for featuring pornographic images and material, a clear violation of our guidelines. We also received customer complaints about possible child pornography. We've asked the developer to put safeguards in place to prevent pornographic images and material in their app.

MacRumors attracts a broad audience of both consumers and professionals interested in the latest technologies and products. We also boast an active community focused on purchasing decisions and technical aspects of the iPhone, iPod, iPad, and Mac platforms.

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